Tierney Davis Hogan

dec-2014-meTierney grew up in Long Island and Upstate New York. After finishing nursing school, she moved to Houston, Texas and then Seattle, Washington. While in Seattle, WA, a friend convinced her to learn to quilt.  She struggled through my first quilt in 1999 under the guidance of my friend, Judy D., and Roxanne Carter, a renowned local teacher and author.

She was not convinced that quilting was for her until she made my second quilt on her own and sent it as a surprise to her sister. A couple days after sending the quilt to her sister, Tierney received a phone call from her sister, who had tears in her voice and Tierney thought it was an emergency. Happily she discovered the tears were tears of joy! Her sister stated: “I got the quilt you made me…I did not know someone loved me this much!”

After that experience, she was hooked on quilting and was amazed that bits of fabric sewn together could bring such happiness to people.

Tierney shares the rest of her textile journey in her own words:

In 2005 I moved to Central Oregon. One of the first people I met in Bend was Betty Anne Guadalupe, a long- arm quilter and art quilter. We kept randomly running into each other around town – as if the universe was insisting we become friends! Under Betty Anne’s mentorship, I moved from traditional quilting into more free-form art quilting.

I  am greatly inspired by the work of the incredibly talented Central Oregon art quilting community, and the art quilting pieces and publications by Jean Wells of The Stitchin’ Post in Sisters, Oregon. Under these influences I now see quilting as more than assembling fabric into a lap or bed covering, but a medium in which to express my creative dreams.

The quote which inspires me everyday (and I have it on my studio wall): “Use what talents you possess; the woods would be very silent if no birds sang there except those that sang best” – Henry Van Dyke.


Tierney Davis Hogan is a member of Studio Art Quilt Associates (SAQA) and a member of the Women of Color Quilters Network (WCQN). She blogs about her crafting adventures on her tierneycreates blog – tierneycreates.com


Samples of her work

(please see the Tierney’s Textile Art page for the complete collection of her art quilts):

OHIO SHIFTED (2016)

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Ohio Shifted (2016). Photographed by Tierney Davis Hogan

18” W x 14.25” L, recycled Silks

Designed, pieced and quilted by Tierney Davis Hogan

ARTIST’S STATEMENT:

Ohio Shifted (2016) embraces the Creative Quilt Challenges, CHALLENGE #3: “Unlikely Materials”. It also and embraces the name of this exhibit-within-an-exhibit, “Shape Shifting”. Made from recycled silk samples and scraps from garment manufacturing (“unlikely materials”), Ohio Shifted began its art quilt life as a very different piece.

It was originally created as part of a challenge with a friend to use up the scraps from her piece, a reinvented Ohio Star block, and was titled “Ohio”. The borders on the piece were dull brown garment silk and muddied the overall look. I decided to “Shape Shift” it, and rework the piece and its borders. Instead of a dull brown silk border, I used bright fuchsia raw silk found at a thrift store (another “unlikely material”).

Shifting the dimensions and overall shape of the of the miniature square-within-a-square log cabin blocks in the center; and floating them brightly colored raw silk, I created a new version of the original piece “Ohio”. It is now “Shifted”.


THE RECYCLED DOOR (2016)

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The Recycled Door (2016). Photographed by Marion Shimoda.

18” W x 40” L, recycled clothing and recycled home decor fabric

Designed and pieced by Tierney Davis Hogan; Quilted by Betty Anne Guadalupe

ARTIST’S STATEMENT:

The first in the series The Recyclings, this quilt was inspired by the 2016 Central Oregon SAQA (Studio Art Quilt Associates) challenge to create an 18″ x 40″ art quilt/wallhanging that represented our interpretation of a door. My “door” created from using recycled materials: jeans, corduroy shirts, a tweed jumper, and home decor fabric, was based on a door image on Australian door and window manufacturer’s website – Brisbane Timber. This is my interpretation of one of their doors.


COLOR STUDY I: FLYING TRIANGLES (2012)  

Color Study 1: Reflections of Flying Triangles (2012)

Color Study I: Flying Triangles (2012). Photography by Jeremy Koons.

45 ” W x 44.5″ L, silk & linen garment scraps pieced on muslin

Designed and pieced by Tierney Davis Hogan; Quilted by Betty Anne Guadalupe

ARTIST’S STATEMENT:

Inspired by Jean Hunt’s “Aurora” in Quick Colorful Quilts, edited by Rosemary Wilkinson (2003), I pieced linen and silk sample scraps onto a muslin foundation as an experiment. I was not sure where the piece was headed and then it suddenly came together. While designing this quilt I was overwhelmed with all the possible beautiful color combinations – at times my mind was working faster than my hands could put combinations together!


COLOR STUDY II: SILK LANDSCAPE (2012) 

Color Study 2: Silk Landscape

Color Study II: Silk Landscape (2012). Photography by Jeremy Koons.

36″ W x 23″ L, silk and linen garment samples

Designed and pieced by Tierney Davis Hogan; Quilted by Betty Anne Guadalupe

ARTIST STATEMENT:

This quilt began as an experiment – piecing strips of silk and linen garment samples and scraps in the same color family; then slicing them into strips. I was not sure where this quilt was heading and I started to abandon it several times. Finally, it came together as I decided to insert strips of copper colored raw silk (purchased second hand from a thrift store) to break up the panels I had created.


COLOR STUDY III: RANDOM NOT SO RANDOM (2012)

Color Study 3: Random not so Random (2012)

Random Not So Random (2016). Photographed by Jeremy Koons.

24″ W X 33″ L , linen and silk garment samples

Designed and pieced by Tierney Davis Hogan; Quilted by Betty Anne Guadalupe

ARTIST STATEMENT:

A pure experiment in assembling random pieces, which became less random as the quilt progressed. The center piece came out of assembling, cutting and re-assembling strips of silk and linen garment samples and scraps in various combinations. The inserted slivers of color were an afterthought and helped provide additional interest to the piece.


COLOR CHANGE (2012)

Color Change (2012). Designed and pieced by Tierney Davis Hogan. Quilted by Betty Anne Guadalupe. Photography by Jeremy Koons.

Color Change (2012). Photographed by Jeremy Koons.

53″ W x 73″ L, linen and silk

Designed and pieced by Tierney Davis Hogan; Quilted by Betty Anne Guadalupe

ARTIST STATEMENT:

I had been working in fairly bright and bold palette of silk and linen garment samples and scraps for the “Color Study” series. While over Betty Anne’s house I noticed a pile of brown silks she had put aside for project. Her pile of brown silk and linen remnants inspired me to create a piece in dark deep colors with brown as the focal color.


HE DRESSES UP, HE DRESSES DOWN (2014)

 

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He Dresses Up, He Dresses Down (2014). Photographed by Tierney Davis Hogan.

48″ L x 27″ W, recycled jeans, wool blanket & menswear wool suiting scraps

Designed and pieced by Tierney Davis Hogan; Quilted by Betty Anne Guadalupe

 ARTIST STATEMENT:

Inspired by the quilts from old denim blue jeans that Betty Anne Guadalupe was working on, I wanted to create a denim scrap quilt which mixed denim with wool. Using Pendleton blanket scraps and mens suiting wool scraps that had been donated, I created a quilt to represent the duality of the way a man can dress – “dressing up” for the office and business world and “dressing down” for casual comfort when not working.


ARCHAEOLOGICAL DIG: THE VESSEL (2015)

Floating Vessel (2015). Designed & pieced by Tierney Davis Hogan. Quilted by Betty Anne Guadalupe.

Archaeological Dig: The Vessel (2015). Photographed by Tierney Davis Hogan.

33″ L x 26 1/2″ W, recycled silk garment scraps, specially dyed cotton fabric

Designed and pieced by Tierney Davis Hogan; Quilted by Betty Anne Guadalupe

 ARTIST STATEMENT:

In this collaborative piece, I (Tierney Davis Hogan) wanted to create an art quilt that represents the human experience as interconnected but solitary vessels moving through time and place. I pieced recycled silks to float in a tonal variegated cotton background. Betty Anne Guadalupe quilted this piece to elicit the feel of something old, discovered deep in the earth, as during an archeological dig. The iridescence in the piece reflect the light that shines within each of us, growing brighter as we share our collective experiences.


ABANDONED WATER STRUCTURE (2015)

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Abandoned Structure (2015). Photographed by Tierney Davis Hogan

40″ L x 18″ W, recycled silk garment scraps, specially dyed cotton fabric

Designed and pieced by Tierney Davis Hogan; Quilted by Betty Anne Guadalupe

ARTIST STATEMENT:

An abandoned power plant along a river in Oregon and the austere decay of the weather worn structure inspired this collaborative piece. It  inspired my piecing of recycled silk garment sample scraps into a gray tonal variegated cotton background; and inspired the quilting by Betty Anne Guadalupe, intuitively based on the actual photograph of the decaying structure and the water flowing around it. As technological progress is made and people migrate to urban areas, there is beauty to be found in the historical weather worn abandoned structures left behind.

Not available for sale, purchased by the City of Seattle for the Seattle Public Utilities Portlable Works Collection


All images and works are property of Improvisational Textiles, Betty Anne Guadalupe and Tierney Davis Hogan, and cannot be used without their permission. ©